Top 5 Tips When Buying a Green Washing Machine

Should you? Buy a new washing machine that is. On average, each washer in the UK carries out 270 cycles per year according to research carried out by the University of Oxford’s Environmental Change Institute (ECI), leaving only 95 days out 365 free from the whir of laundry appliances per household. https://blogchamsoc.com/kem-tri-mun-hieu-qua/ It’s unsurprising then that washing machine repair is such big business but it is still often economically preferable than buying a new one.

Washerss are notoriously energy hungry and with the average washing machine gargling between 40 and 60 litres of water per cycle according to uswitch.com and Which?, they’re pretty thirsty too.

So, is the UK Government ensuring that enough has been done to address these energy consumption issues? After all, most consumers would want the opportunity to do their bit for the environment but would unlikely be prepared to give up their laundry appliance (i.e. washing machine or tumble dryer) altogether even if there wasn’t a green alternative.

Washers have been a feature of the modern home for the last 40 years at least and have become an essential part of western living. Even in the knowledge that in 2005 ground water levels were lower than they’ve been for 20 years in the UK and rare plants, birds and wildlife were dying out as a result, justifying washing all clothes by hand would be nye on impossible. Therefore, the only viable solution is to turn the technology we have green.

Energy consumed by a washer depends on a number of factors, including cycle temperature (90, 60, 40 degrees etc) and the energy rating of the machine. But what should you consider when buying a new washing machine and should you buy a new one at all or instead look into washing machine repair? Read on to find out…

  1. While energy efficiency labels can be a good indicator of a washer’s performance, this is exactly how they should be viewed – as an indicator. The A to G ratings that have recently been introduced are awarded based on tests of washing machine cycles run at 60 degrees, with A being the most energy efficient at 60 degrees and G being the least efficient. As most of us wash at 40 degrees and are being encouraged to lower this even further to 30 and even 20 degrees by washing powder manufacturers, take these energy labels as just one of the ways you choose a washing machine.
  2. Remember that reliability is just an important a factor as energy efficiency -washing machine repairs can be a more cost efficient option than simply throwing your old one away and is worth looking into when you consider the cost not only to you but to the environment of disposing of the old one. There are lots of comparison articles online and customer reviews online that will guide you in the right direction.
  3. When you consider the costs of replacing a washing machine, consider the impact disposing of your old one can have on the environment. Under the WEEE (Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment) Directive, retailers now have a responsibility to assist customers in getting rid of their old machine when they buy a new one. This will normally take the form of paying towards the cost of recycling it or a collection and recycle service.
  4. Remember that the initial financial outlay of buying a new washer might be more than you planned but it’s worth considering what it could save you in the long run, i.e. per wash and per year. It’s often worth investing in a more expensive washing machine and giving yourself the best chance of having it around for a few years – remember the reliability tip we gave you earlier. Buying a well known brand can also bring down the cost of washing machine repairs too.

 

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